Clydebank

Scotland’s second Children’s Neighbourhood was established in 2019 in the town of Clydebank. The work here is based around the community at Radnor Park.

The town of Clydebank has seen significant changes over the past few decades, due in large part to economic shifts. These have included the decline of the shipbuilding industry in Scotland, and the recession in 2008.

The Neighbourhood

Radnor Park

Sitting in central Clydebank, the socio-economic situation in Radnor Park is similar to that of Bridgeton & Dalmarnock. The child poverty rate of the area is 33%, with high levels of unemployment and low-quality housing prevalent issues affecting locals living here.

We’re working in partnership with local organisations to help alleviate the impacts of such issues. One of our main aims is to respond to the views of children and young people who live here.

There are four local schools in the area: Kilbowie PS, St. Eunan’s PS, St. Peter the Apostle HS, and Clydebank HS.

The local partners in the area include Y Sort It, and West Dunbartonshire Council.

Y Sort It is currently the only organisation offering free provision for local children and young people. They offer street play sessions, youth groups, mentoring for those who are care-experienced, and a group for young carers.

The CNS team have been building relationships with these schools and organisations, helping put children and young people at the heart of their own goal-setting.

What’s happening?

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the CNS team were busy working with different groups of children, young people and stakeholders in Clydebank.

Together they developed a ‘wellbeing framework’, and this work allowed young people to prioritise the things they felt they needed to achieve their potential.

It’s a really useful tool for assessing how well policies and services support children and young people in achieving their desired goals:

As well as this, we’ve also been working alongside other local services, projects and groups in the wider community.

Unfortunately, COVID-19 brought a sudden change of direction to our activities in Radnor Park, though. Activities such as the ‘Creative Club’ and the ‘Family Group’ were put on hold – and plans for initiatives such as ‘Get Involved Radnor Park’ and a ‘Community Cafe’ have also paused for now.

Since March 2020, we’ve been focusing on discussion and planning, and exploring new options for children and young people in Clydebank instead. Our Local Coordinator has worked closely with the Outreach team at Y Sort It, helping to facilitate online arts projects, for example.

When easing of pandemic restrictions allowed, we also began running a weekly juice stall in Radnor Park. This was in collaboration with local cafe, Bankies Bites.

Doing so has been a great help in gauging the types of provision and activities people have been looking for during the COVID-19 lockdown.

Looking Ahead

The past year has posed some significant challenges, but we’re pleased to see our relationships with partners in Radnor Park now flourishing.

We’re excited to get back out in the neighbourhood when it’s possible to do so, and reconnect with all involved in driving activities forward – and helping tackle the issues most important to young people in the area.

Get in touch!

Each Children’s Neighbourhood site has a ‘Local Coordinator’ based in the community.

They’re your first point of contact for CNS in the area, and they can help you connect with local organisations, their activities and their services.

Glenn Hays is our new Local Coordinator for Radnor Park. He will be continuing the great work started by Victoria Bianchi over the last year – from facilitating collaboration with local organisations, families, children and young people, to aligning efforts which support change.